Viewing entries in
yoga privates

Yoga privates in Sayulita | Blog post by SayulitaLife

Comment

Yoga privates in Sayulita | Blog post by SayulitaLife

[This is a guest post by Stacey Elkins for SayulitaLife]

A Relaxing Treat in Sayulita: A Private Yoga Class with Eva Estlander Yoga

Photos: Camilla Fuchs Photography

Savasana love.

Savasana love.

It was early Thursday evening and it had been another busy day, leaving me feeling exhausted and drained. As I took my place on the yoga mat at Don Pedro’s Brisa Mar Palapain Sayulita, I could feel the day’s stress already start to melt away. A gentle, cool breeze, the scent of incense, and the sound of waves hitting the shore further enhanced my relaxation as I prepared for my first private yin yoga class with Eva Estlander Yoga, in which she is in high demand.

Eva explained that yin yoga is about relaxing the body, not activating the muscles. It’s about working with the body’s connective tissue, which is a thick, white layer of tissue that holds the parts of the body together. It’s about finding your edge, how deep you can go in a pose (most focusing on the hips, glutes, and inner thighs), without feeling any pain or tingling. It’s about using your breath to move deeper into each pose, which is held between two and eight minutes. Relaxation in yin yoga is the ultimate goal, offering a nice balance from the active lifestyle in which most of live.

For the first pose, Eva had me lie on my back, a yoga bolster placed under my knees, my arms spread out on each side. Her soft, gentle voice acted as a meditative guide as she had me visualize a bright orange wheel of light filling my body and spinning as I inhaled, tension leaving my body as I exhaled. She explained that the body has seven main chakras (energy centers), and that two of them are the main focus in yin yoga: The root chakra at the base of the spine (represents feeling supported and grounded) and the sacral chakra just beneath the naval (represents creativity and sexuality).

Throughout my private class with Eva Estlander Yoga, I felt extremely relaxed as Eva guided me through the poses, which included pigeon, cow, half moon, and more. Eva was very attentive, offering gentle adjustments as needed, which further enhanced the experience. For the straddle pose, she encouraged me do three levels of stretching, which was made possible by utilizing a yoga bolster, yoga block, and a blanket. Each pose offered a nice stretch as I found stillness and enjoyed the solitude of the practice.

During the final pose, savasana, Eva incorporated two natural oils, which are made for the elements of the chakras in which we focused during the class. The scent of orange, as well as a nutmeg mix filled the air, as the sound of a singing bowl and hand drums created beautiful, inviting tones. Eva gently pushed on my shoulders and arms and massaged my temples and between my eyes as I lay on the mat completely relaxed and feeling rejuvenated. The sun had set, the night was silent, and I couldn’t have felt better.

Comment

Energy exchange

Energy exchange

I want to write about something that I sometimes struggle with, which is getting fairly compensated for the work I do. I understand this is a sensitive subject, but I feel like it is something we as yoga teachers, and especially female yoga teachers can get better at. Maybe some of you now think, "wait, that's not very yogic to be writing about money", but let me tell you something, yoga teachers still have their bills to pay for.

In yoga, there is something called seva, which translates into selfless service and it basically means that you do an act of kindness or you be of service without expecting anything in return. This is a beautiful philosophy and definitely something that you can incorporate into your every day life or even your yoga practice by offering free yoga classes once in a while. However, when it comes to teaching yoga as your profession, it is still work, and obviously you need to be compensated for it.

To become a yoga teacher is not a walk in the park and most likely you need years of experience under your belt, at least one (usually very expensive) teacher training and lots of teaching hours. Not to mention, you need to understand human anatomy and be able to offer modifications for injuries, be creative (with sequencing and maybe playlists) and hold space. The good news is get to share what you love.

yoga_sayulita

A friend (who also happens to be an amazing energy worker) recently told me that she feels drained after treating her clients if the compensation does not match the energy she is putting out as a healer. This might sound a little wack to some of you, but on many levels it makes sense. There needs to be a fair exchange of energy, and yes, money is a form of energy. It is in our human nature to want to bargain and get the best deals so that we feel that we've gained something, but keep in mind, when you bargain that little extra something you're basically pulling money out of someone else's pocket. That being said, I do believe in giving local discounts, friend discounts and package discounts. Heck yes, who doesn't want a package deal!

Something I've also noticed I am guilty of is the tendency to undercut myself when I want to ensure a job. I think like with basically everything else in life, clear communication also works wonders here. So my tip to you is: ask for what you think is fair and also put yourself in the customer's shoes. Does it feel good? Does it feel fair? If the answer is no, re-evaluate. Negotiating is a fine dance and a skill some people have naturally, when some of us just have to learn and get over the "shame monster" which so often is involved when it comes to chatting monetary compensation. There's a great Finnish saying that goes: "the one asking is not dumb, it's the one paying". Take it with a grain of salt please :D.

These are my thoughts, I'd love to here yours if you have any input or ideas on how to ask for what in your mind feels fair?